Video Wall Fault Tolerance article

I wrote an article for Sound and Communications Magazine on Video Wall Fault Tolerance.

http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/544901a3#/544901a3/53

Hiperwall Fault Tolerance

In March, I wrote a post on Fault Tolerance for the Hiperwall blog. I’ll link to it here since my name didn’t get attached to it there.

 

See the (Really) Big Picture

At Hiperwall, our tagline is “See the big picture” and we do that well. In applications from scientific visualization to control rooms and operations centers, being able to see lots of information in great detail allows our users to understand more clearly and make important decisions quickly. We’ve shown billion pixel images on Hiperwall systems, . . . → Read More: See the (Really) Big Picture

Problems with Click-Through Software License Agreements and Privacy

Almost every software product has a click-through End User License Agreement (EULA) that we typically just click OK on so we can actually use the software. Perhaps we shouldn’t be so quick to click, because we’re often giving up our privacy or agreeing to other restrictions, but the software companies have us over a barrel, . . . → Read More: Problems with Click-Through Software License Agreements and Privacy

How to log in to your locked Windows 10 computer

For those of us that have used Windows 7 for a long time, the Windows 10 login mechanism is annoying, and that’s doubly so when your machine is locked. So I’ve made a handy guide that describes the login process for a locked Windows 10 system.

Type your password and press Enter. This obviously doesn’t . . . → Read More: How to log in to your locked Windows 10 computer

My thoughts on the Apple/FBI terrorist iPhone unlocking conundrum

My initial reaction to Apple fighting the court order to unlock the terrorist’s iPhone was “Good for Apple. Doing anything that could reduce my privacy is bad!” And lots of the breathless news reports continued to make me think that way with all the talk of backdoors and such.

But then I started reading articles . . . → Read More: My thoughts on the Apple/FBI terrorist iPhone unlocking conundrum

Microsoft Surface Book First Impressions

I got my new Microsoft Surface Book last night and have decidedly mixed impressions of it. The hardware seems top notch, while the operating system and software are much worse than expected. If only Microsoft were a company that primarily made operating systems and software, I’m sure this sort of thing wouldn’t happen. Oh, wait…

. . . → Read More: Microsoft Surface Book First Impressions

The Apple Pencil: A Less Cynical View

Apple announced, among other things yesterday, the iPad Pro with support for a stylus called the Apple Pencil. This has the Internet Cynics Brigade doubled over in laughter as they post meme pictures with Steve Jobs saying that if you see a stylus or a task manager, they’ve done it wrong. They’re also busy posting . . . → Read More: The Apple Pencil: A Less Cynical View

Information overload, yet too little information

We live in a world that has more information available online than ever before. Granted, much of it is unreliable or useless, but even the small fraction that is valuable is more voluminous than most people could have imagined even a few years ago. But the problem is that a lot of local information that . . . → Read More: Information overload, yet too little information

Amazon Echo is surprisingly handy

I set up my (or rather my wife’s) Amazon Echo last night. I have a hard time not calling the Amazon “Alexa,” because that’s how you address it. You say “Alexa play some rock music” and it does so.

The Echo is a black cylinder that listens for commands and questions and sometimes does what . . . → Read More: Amazon Echo is surprisingly handy